Monthly Archives: November 2011

Patrick Nolan Week 14

At first, this week’s readings don’t seem to be well connected or centered around one particular theme. That being said, the ideas presented can all come together to represent viewpoints in the same conversation.  A main question that arises from … Continue reading

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Week 13 Question

“Strong ties convinced friends and family to join the demonstration; the more abundant and diverse weak ties bridged communities and spread the news widely even in the face of government manipulation of mass media and shutdown of the internet and … Continue reading

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Week 13

Zhou et al. points out that the influence of social media during the Egyptian revolution should not be overestimated. He also points out that only one fifth of Egyptians got their news from social media. My question is, what do … Continue reading

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Week 13 – Spinweber

A common theme in recent readings has been an analysis of social media’s effectiveness.  There are authors that say Twitter is more influential because of the popularity it has built through word of mouth as opposed to actual outcome; there … Continue reading

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Week 13 Question

We have previously looked at the prevalence of Twitter in the Iranian revolutions. Some authors asserted that its influence was overstated while others deemed these revolutions to be modern because of the use of social media. The authors for this … Continue reading

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Week 13 Question

The articles by Zhou, et al. and Kinsman both describe uprisings, especially in the Middle East. Additionally, both articles discuss the potential impact of these technologies. In each case, the importance of these social technologies in causing or advancing the … Continue reading

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Week 13

This weeks readings focused on the use of Twitter in the Arab Spring, do you think that Twitter was actually that powerful when it came to these revolutions? How was the Arab Spring able to overcome the weak ties that … Continue reading

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Week 13 Question

In the past we have discussed the notion that social media’s role in movements is overstated based in part on the idea that movements are nothing new. Do you think this is the case with the uprisings in the Arab … Continue reading

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Week 12

In the Zhou reading, the use of Twitter and Facebook were discussed in conjuction with the Egyptian revolution.  He seems to take more of a middle ground, claiming that social media played some role in mobilization and organization, but it … Continue reading

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Week 13

This weeks readings discuss Twitters role in spreading information about the Tunisian and Egyptian Revolutions.  How do you use Twitter? Do you use it to follow news sources and spread information or purely to follow friends? Do you feel like … Continue reading

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week 13

“Social media” is such a broad term to describe many tools, including but not limited to SMS, Twitter, and Facebook.  While each author has a differing opinion on the degree that social media played a role in the activism in … Continue reading

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week 13

The authors this week dsicuss the important role that Twitter played in the uprisings in Egypt and Lybia. Why do you believe there was a change in the significance of twitter from when it was used in the Iranian Revolution. … Continue reading

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Week 13- Are the effects of Social media overestimated?

Kinsman discusses the impact of text messaging, twitter, and Facebook on various revolutions across the Arab world, but notes that it is still the people, not technologies,  that are making revolutions. He discusses the basic rules to success emphasizing that … Continue reading

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Week 13

This week, the Lotanetal reading discussed the various revolutions that were tweeted: specifically the Tunisian and Egyptian Revolutions. The reading went in depth about the various roles that Twitter plays in portraying and amplifying information throughout the world. My question … Continue reading

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Week 13 question

In the readings this week, social media are highlighted as being crucial in the revolution in the Middle-East especially when conventional media sources, largely abroad, have amplified information that is circulating through Tweets. That the world was watching is also … Continue reading

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Week 13

Haas discusses the Egyptian revolution specifically, and the various elements that may have contributed to it’s success. Some elements he sites are: slow, tactful execution of the plan, lack of early elections, constitutional reform, and groups splitting into factions. Similarly, … Continue reading

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Week 13

There has been mixed criticism as to whether Twitter and other social networking sites such as Facebook served as a fundamental element into the success of the continuous revolutions in the Middle East and North Africa that culminated the Arab … Continue reading

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Week 13

We have read several articles arguing that Twitter and other social media mediums are to credit for these revolutions while some articles have taken the opposing side. Given evidence for both sides of the argument, what do you think Twitter … Continue reading

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Week 13 Question – Emily Thibodeau

Zhuo and Kinsman both believe Twitter enabled some aspects of the recent revolutions in Tunisia and Egypt. But it is also of note that only some members of these societies had internet access at all, in the case of Egypt – most … Continue reading

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Week 13

It is interesting to see that one of the Lotan et. al. conclusions is that during a volatile event, individuals are more likely to be trusted than organizations. How does this theory fare with the past theorists that we have … Continue reading

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Patrick Nolan Week 13

Some argue that Twitter was a fundamental tool used in the revolutions in Egypt, Tunisia, and Lybia while others argue that Twitter really didn’t play an important role.  Do you think the revolutions would have played out in the same … Continue reading

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Week 13 Question

Jeremy Kinsman lists ten rules to revolutionary success in his article; one of which states: “There is no singltemplate for democracy. Each trajectory is different, pending on traditions and state readiness (43).” How does this apply to the varying cases … Continue reading

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Week 13 Readings Karen Saukas

My question for the class this week is:  Do you believe that the United State’s forceful involvement in Iraq has been more beneficial than not regarding Iraq’s transition towards a more democratic government, or, like some of this week’s readings … Continue reading

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Week 12 – Spinweber

This weeks readings looked at social media, specifically Twitter, and asked if these sites were really as influential as they have been portrayed to be.  Morozov and Gladwell both discuss how the perceived influence of these social networking sites is … Continue reading

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week 12

Introduction Gladwell and Morozov explore the role of Twitter and social media generally in several revolutions, with a particular focus on Iran.    Both point out a plethora of weakness stemming from activism carried out via social media tools.  Thus, a … Continue reading

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Week 12 Schwarz

This week focuses on a different subject than we have been studying; how the internet (most specifically Twitter) isn’t quite the powerhouse that people assume that it is. Morozov and Gladwell both provide compelling arguments as to how the public … Continue reading

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Week 12

Both Morozov and Gladwell discuss the accuracy of considering the recent uprising in Iran a “Twitter Revolution.” He states how Twitter could be a great forum for a Revolution. As Morozov writes, the short and fast nature of a Tweet … Continue reading

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Week 12

Gladwell first asserts that social media tools like Facebook and Twitter have recently reinvented social activism. Social media had made it so that authority and popular will do not have the same relationship that they have in the past. Now, … Continue reading

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Week 12

This week’s readings focused on the “Twitter Revolution” in Iran, and how much of an impact Twitter really had in the revolution. Morozov and Gladwell are skeptical about calling the revolution a “Twitter Revolution.” As we have read, Morozov does not believe that … Continue reading

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week 12 blog post

Gladwell and Morozov make very good points, supported with strong evidence, about the overestimated worship of social media, including Twitter, in American media in the Iranian “twitter revolution”. Gladwell advocates that in order to have effective high-risk activism, there needs … Continue reading

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