Monthly Archives: November 2012

Try to silence us, we’ll only yell louder

In Social Media and the Decision to Participate in Political Protest, Tufecki and Wilson observe the uprising in Egypt’s Tahrir Square. They explore the role social media and the Internet had in organizing and facilitating the protests that occurred in … Continue reading

Posted in Winter 2012 | 3 Comments

Social Media and News; Who Has Control?

In The Role of Digital Media, the story of political change with regards to the emergence of social media is told in terms of the globalization of news. While before digital technology it was difficult and costly to transmit important … Continue reading

Posted in Winter 2012 | 2 Comments

The Arab Spring and Social Media

The Arab Spring, even with the radical differences between countries as Anderson points out, was largely influenced by social media and networking with available technologies. While reviewing the arguments presented in these readings, Clay Shirky’s idea of collective action should … Continue reading

Posted in Fall 2012, Week 13 | 2 Comments

In Demystifying the Arab Spring by Lisa Anderson, she immediately makes the claim that the internet was not to receive credit in the events surrounding the revolutions in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya. She provides evidence for this by comparing the … Continue reading

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Where is the Egyptian voice and experience in the use of social media in political activism within Egypt?

Last week the Elthman and Burns’ article explored the importance of Twitter during the 2009 election in Iran, how different political actors and protestors used the social media site and how political actors responded to its use. While other theorists … Continue reading

Posted in Week 13, Winter 2012 | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

Revolts in the Arab World

Anderson’s reading regarding the Arab Spring introduced and explained the reasons behind as well as the execution of many of the happenings in the Arab world in 2011.  She detailed the differences between what happened in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya … Continue reading

Posted in Winter 2012 | 1 Comment

Social Media and Arab Spring

The Arab Spring seems to be the perfect example of how social media gave rise to the individual as journalist by providing the people with a mode of communication that the regime could not control.  On many levels, this is … Continue reading

Posted in Winter 2012 | Leave a comment

How the Internet helped – not initiated – the Arab Spring

The ability to rise up and demonstrate is not a new idea, but can be taken to greater depths with improved communication. By looking at the Arab Spring and the various protests that were had, we can see how Shirky’s … Continue reading

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Revolution & the Future

In Lisa Anderson’s Demystifying the Arab Spring, the Arab Spring is explored through three different manifestations that it took in Tunisia, Libya, and Egypt. Anderson is quick to point out that it is important to not think of the Arab … Continue reading

Posted in Winter 2012 | 1 Comment

In her article “Demystifying the Arab Spring,” Lisa Anderson describes the false concept that the Arab Spring uprisings across the Middle East are all connected by similarities. She explains how the revolts in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya were all rooted … Continue reading

Posted in Fall 2012, Week 13, Weekly Responses | 4 Comments

Facebook and Twitter and Youtube, Oh My!

        In the 2011 Arab revolts, Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya were turned upside down, their governments destroyed. Civilians fought for change and made a great deal of noise. While the occurrence of the Arab Spring is undeniable, … Continue reading

Posted in Winter 2012 | Tagged | Leave a comment

Can we employ digital media to drive protests?

After studying the social-movements in the Arab world, I believe that social networks were partially responsible for the uprisings in Tunisia and Egypt. In the journal “Role of the Digital Media” Phillip N. Howard and Muzammil M. Hussain illustrate how … Continue reading

Posted in Week 13 | 1 Comment

Timing Leads to Collective Unrest in the Arab Spring

The spread of information is not a new phenomenon, as Anderson (2011) states when describing how news expands globally. However, the techniques by which the spread occurs has changed recently, and the impact of this new mechanism of sharing information … Continue reading

Posted in Fall 2012 | Leave a comment

Digital Media and Political Movements

In The Role of Digital Media, Philip Howard and Muzammil Hussain write extensively about the impact of digital media – the Internet, cell phones and social media – on political change in the Middle East. The authors claim that, “using … Continue reading

Posted in Winter 2012 | Leave a comment

Five Phases of Revolution

In Howard’s and Hussain’s article The Role of Digital Media, he finds that there are five phases in the recent Arab Spring that each country went through; all of the phases heavily rely on social media. In phase 1, preparation, is … Continue reading

Posted in Winter 2012 | Tagged | Leave a comment

The Role of Social Media in the Arab Spring

In The Role of Digital Media, Philip Howard and Muzammil Hussain discuss the impacts of social media on the uprisings in the Middle East. Echoing Shirky, they believe that new technology has facilitated the democratization of underdeveloped countries. Digital tools … Continue reading

Posted in Fall 2012, Week 13 | 1 Comment

Social Media and the Mubarak Regime

The Tufekci and Wilson article found that the Internet, cell phones, and social media contributed to lowering the costs of initiating and organizing collective action to bring down Mubarak’s authoritarian regime.  Through these forms of communication Egyptian protesters were able … Continue reading

Posted in Winter 2012 | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Social Media, Democracy, and the Arab Spring

This weeks readings discuss the role that social media played in aiding in democracy in the Arab Spring. Howard’s article, “The Upheavals in Egypt and Tunisia: The Role of Digital Media,” delves into the ways in which digital media played … Continue reading

Posted in Fall 2012, Week 13 | 1 Comment

Pushing Weak Ties to the Side

The readings this week continued to build on the issue of how much social media helped in the Arab Spring.   While the readings last week centered around the use of Twitter in “Iran’s Twitter Revolution,” this week’s focus is on … Continue reading

Posted in Fall 2012, Week 13 | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Bulletin Board…Xerox…Twitter?

In the readings by Morozov and Gladwell, the role of social media in the Iranian revolution  is discussed and questioned. Did twitter truly spark a revolution in a country that long had government controlled media brainwashing its people, or was … Continue reading

Posted in Winter 2012 | 2 Comments

Revolution and Limits on the Twitterverse

This week’s reading focuses on Iran’s 2009 protests and the role played by social media. Howard’s article examines the role of social media and questions its actual ability to effect change. Social and mobile media have played major roles in … Continue reading

Posted in Fall 2012 | 2 Comments

The Twitter Sphere

In the article titled “Twitter Free Iran: An Evaluation of Twitter’s Role in Public Diplomacy and Information Operations in Iran’s 2009 Election Crisis” Burns and Eltham talk to the readers about the increasing use of twitter within the past five … Continue reading

Posted in Winter 2012 | 2 Comments

Social activism through Twitter

The idea of new technology and globalization leading to world peace is not a new concept. The creators and investors in the telegraph thought that the new technology would ultimately lead to understanding between cultures and people. While this was … Continue reading

Posted in Fall 2012 | 2 Comments

Protests: Then & Now

Malcolm Gladwell’s article Small Change: Why the Revolution Will Not be Tweeted was extremely thought provoking. He provided a unique, and easy to understand prospective on Social Media  (Twitter) and its role in the protests following the Iranian elections in … Continue reading

Posted in Winter 2012 | Tagged , | 2 Comments

Tweeting Ignorantly

In the reading, “Iran. Downside to the Twitter Movement” it is not surprising that Morozov believes Twitter’s revolution in Iran did not have as great of an impact as most may have originally thought.  Many want to think Twitter and … Continue reading

Posted in Winter 2012 | 3 Comments

The Nature of Change: Iranians and Americans

‘How is this movement going to help me?’ This is the question that appears to be at the core of all social movements. Naturally, it makes sense that people gravitate to a situation thats appears on the surface level will … Continue reading

Posted in Winter 2012 | Leave a comment

Social Media and Candidacy

In the increasingly digitally controlled environment we’ve become a part of, it is essentially impossible for a political candidate to succeed without an online presence. While 20 years ago this presence could be reduced to a simple website of information, … Continue reading

Posted in Winter 2012 | Leave a comment

Uses of Internet Tools

In Mundane Internet Tools, Mobilizing Practices, and the Coproduction of Citizenship in Political Campaigns, Rasmus Kleis Neilson explains that there are a plethora of Internet tools available that can be used to increase political participation and ultimately the active exercise of citizenship through volunteering … Continue reading

Posted in Winter 2012 | 4 Comments

Web Firms

The accomplishments of the company Blue State Digital are impressive and thorough within the cluttered state of the Internet and today’s media landscape. The 2004 Dean campaign was innovative, and out of the campaign’s success many web firms were birthed, … Continue reading

Posted in Winter 2012 | 4 Comments

Do Emerging Tools Increase Votes?

It is easy to think that because the Internet is has demolished transaction costs, less broad campaigns like those for lower-elected officials could utilize emerging Internet tools to increase political mobilization in their favor. Many political campaigns are excited about … Continue reading

Posted in Fall 2012, Week 10, Weekly Responses | 1 Comment