Category Archives: Week 5

A Mind of Our Own

Realizing the Social Internet? Online Social Networking Meets Offline Civic Engagement by Pasek, More, and Romer is a study about social networking sites (SNSs) and how they help or hurt users social capital.  Looking specifically at MySpace and Facebook and … Continue reading

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Social Networking and Political Campaigns

Online social networking has become a key ingredient in social capital, especially when launching a political campaign to endorse either a political issue or even a political candidate. Facebook and Twitter have become, in the modern era, very influential in … Continue reading

Posted in Week 5, Winter 2013 | 1 Comment

The Development of Activist Technology

In his article entitled “Political Factors: Digital Activism in Closed and Open Societies,” Tom Glaisyer discusses the role of social media in political and governmental activism. In particular, he touches on the efforts of several regimes and their successes (or … Continue reading

Posted in Fall 2012, Week 5 | 1 Comment

Social Networking Sites’ Influence on Social Capital

While reading the study by Pasek, More, and Romer, Realizing the Social Internet? Online Social Network Meets Offline Social Capital, I kept thinking of the Uses and Gratification Theory, which states that individuals do not just passively consume media, but … Continue reading

Posted in Fall 2012, Week 5 | 1 Comment

Online Political Activism: Effective or Not?

In the article, “Measuring the Success of Digital Campaigns” Karpf discusses the tactical and strategic measurements of success with political activism online. Karpf argues that strategic measurements, or qualitative measurements, are better indicators, because they measure the overall quality of … Continue reading

Posted in Fall 2012, Week 5, Winter 2012 | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Groupthink on Social Networking Sites

In his book Here Comes Everybody, Shirky theorizes that increased Internet use leads to a greater social capital and collective action. With the increased prevalence of social networking sites, many wondered how this new ability to access instant information at … Continue reading

Posted in Fall 2012, Week 5 | 4 Comments

Differences after the Growth of Facebook and Twitter

The readings this week focus on if social media use promotes a democracy by encouraging social capital and about being strategically successful for new activist campaigns.  Social capital can be evaluated by the amount of civic participation, political knowledge and … Continue reading

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Social Networking Sites and User Engagement

In “Realizing the Social Internet? Online Social Networking Meets Offline Civic Engagement.” Pase, More, and Romer studied online social networking sites, Myspace and Facebook, to see if these sites facilitated or hindered social capital (1).  Before reading the study, I … Continue reading

Posted in Week 5, Winter 2012 | Leave a comment

SNSs and Social Capital

Many debate whether or not social networking sites encourage social capital or hider it. In the study conducted by Pasek, More, and Romer Realizing the Social Internet? Online Social Network Meets Offline Social Capital, they concluded that the influence of … Continue reading

Posted in Fall 2012, Week 5 | 2 Comments

The Role of Social Media in the Arab Spring

In Measuring the Success of Digital Campaigns David Karpf describes what makes a digital campaign successful. He outlines two different ways to assess a campaign—tactical and strategic measures. Tactical metric is when you measure the raw number of traffic a … Continue reading

Posted in Fall 2012, Week 5 | 2 Comments

Glaisyer and Karpf

Glaisyer and Karpf both discuss the importance of social networking on politics. While social networking has become a more important part of politics, it is still not necessarily a deciding factor in what events happen in the world. Glaisyer focuses … Continue reading

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Week 5 Response

Social sites and websites that allow for uploading and sharing of information are a very recent addition to the online world and seem to be increasing social capital and keeping users informed.  These sites however, are growing at a rapid … Continue reading

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Week 5 Response

Dave Karpf’s chapter from Digital Activism Decoded: The New Mechanics of Change examines how to measure the success of digital campaigns and how sometimes numbers can be misleading. Karpf focuses on how Twitter is used, the blogosphere’s impact on campaigns … Continue reading

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Week 5 Blog

The Internet and use of social media sites have both helped and hindered digital activism in political participation and civic engagement. In both: Tom Glaisyer’s article, and Pasek et al., we can see that technology has allowed information to be … Continue reading

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Weekly Response – Pasek

The Josh Pasek reading for this week outlines an experiment designed to highlight the relationship between individual patterns of Internet use with politically engaged citizens. In particular, the study attempts to shed light on the building of social capital with … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized, Week 5 | 3 Comments

Week 5 Response- Sam Moon

The Pasek et. al. study was the first national survey to compare social networking use with offline civic engagement and trust in others on the social networking site. The study focused on the two biggest social networking sites, MySpace and … Continue reading

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Week 5- “Website Culture”

While Pasek argues website use induces a site-specific culture (“website culture”) that can either encourage or hinder social capital and Karpf argues that the most important effects of the candidate gaffes come from the various ways that a new type … Continue reading

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Week Five: Glaisyer and Pasek

You may want to sit down for this one, folks: Contrary to popular belief, social networking sites and emerging communications technology are actually not as valuable tools of empowerment as we think! The articles written by Tom Glaisyer and Pasek, … Continue reading

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The Internet encourages social capital

Although we have explored the different ends of the spectrum concerning the potential for the Internet contributing to social responsibility and political activism, I believe that the new technologies that have surfaced within the last century encourage the increase of … Continue reading

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Week 5

Both Karpf and Pasek focused on how users can use the internet and the effects that it can have on them and their actions. While I believe the Internet medium has an effect on people, the degree that effect has … Continue reading

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Week 5

Combining  Karpf’s arguments for using tactical and strategic measures of digital campaign success could be effective in helping both open and closed societies activists and governments create more effective messages than those cited in Glaisyer. In Karpf’s “Measuring the Success … Continue reading

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week 5 readings

In Karpf’s article, he concludes that the effect of YouTube alone on political matters is not as great as it is thought to be, but rather the involvement of the campaigns and political organizations with Youtube is what makes an … Continue reading

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Week 5 Response

Today, many events are planned and operated through the Internet.  The Internet has provided an easy way for millions of people to come together and organize to fight for a common belief. Last week’s articles offered a more pessimistic approach … Continue reading

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Week 5

In “Realizing the Social Internet? Online Social Networking Meets Offline Social Capital,” Pasek lays out 4 different but related hypothesis. 1) Young people using the Internet for information will exhibit higher levels of civic engagement, political knowledge, and interpersonal trust … Continue reading

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