Tag Archives: Fall 2011

Week 15 The Finale

As I sit here writing my last blog, I am here to discuss about my perspective on the Internet’s future and hopes for the new media landscape my generation has immersed themselves predominantly ran by the Internet. Like Joe Trippi … Continue reading

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Week 14

The authors this week had very compelling, yet mixed arguments. Hindman advocates that infrastructure matters. Cohn suggests that the U.S. government should be involved in social media to make them more available. Hindman argues that there is a distinction on … Continue reading

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Week 14

Many scholars today have questioned the fate of social movements to occur in the future and their turnout. With the introduction of social media, it has been up for debate as to whether this communications outlet has revolutionized the way … Continue reading

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Week 14 – Future Social Movements

The Cohn article discusses the State Departments decision to abandon the America.gov project in order to devote more time to promoting social media sites instead such as Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube. The author presents a reasoning theory which we are … Continue reading

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Week 14

The Abdo piece looks at American support during the attempted Iranian revolution in 2009.  Abdo points out that America did not back this revolution and, “In the end, the state cracked down, the protestors lost momentum, and the movement failed.” … Continue reading

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Week 14

The readings for this week are outlining how the international community, specifically the American government could impact the change to democracy abroad. Cohn is bringing attention to the fact that America.gov is deciding to channel its efforts to various social … Continue reading

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Week 14 – Caitlin Spinweber

This weeks readings were a refreshing outlook on the past few weeks of the course.  Many of our readings have said that social media, Twitter, and Facebook are either instigators of revolutions or are completely uninvolved.  However, this week’s authors … Continue reading

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Week 14: Cody Patton

This week’s readings by Cohn and Abdo focus on how the Internet can be used for political change, and how governments are using social media to reach citizens. Cohn discusses how the government is looking for a more engaging strategy to … Continue reading

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Week 14 Ben Halperin

Cohn and Abdo provide a unique contrast in how governments utilize or control the Internet and social media. Cohn notes the government’s shift away from America.gov to a “‘more proactive’ Web engagement strategy” (Cohn). They describe that their new strategy … Continue reading

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Week 14 – Emily Thibodeau

Both Cohn and Abdo explore American international politics.  Cohn’s news article “State Department Shifts Resources to Social Media” discusses how the white house abandoned america.gov in favor of reaching out to the people via social media.  Projects such as the … Continue reading

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Week 14

In this weeks readings, Cohn and Hindman talk about the effects of internet on politics. As the internet continues to develop the role that it plays in politics continues to change, and governments and politicians must continually adapt as it … Continue reading

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Week 14

In Hindman’s chapter, he discusses how the invention of Mosaic changed the Internet as the world’s first graphical web browser.  Mosaic made the web a medium that anyone could navigate and transformed it from a place mainly for techies and … Continue reading

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Week 14

Intro / Claim: I assert when evaluating Cohn’s optimistic view and Gladwell’s pessimistic argument of the effects of the Internet and SNS’s role in information distribution and activism in light of Dean’s and Obama’s political campaign, there is indeed support … Continue reading

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Jamie Schwarz: Week 14

I’m going to go out on a limb with my argument this week because honestly I feel very confused by all of the material that we have had to read throughout this course. One author tells us that social networking … Continue reading

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Week 14 Response

Social media websites have garnered a lot of attention for playing a part in facilitating protests both in the United States and abroad. In the U.S., the “Occupy” movements have gained steam through social media channels, and protests in countries … Continue reading

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Week 14. The Future of the Internet

The future of the Internet is unknown. Many theorists propose what they think will happen with the Internet. In both the article by Cohn and the reading by Hindman, the authors discuss the importance of tracking information that is being … Continue reading

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Week 14 – Drew Daniel

In the Cohn reading reading it talks about how the State Department had abandoned its previous project of America.gov and has shifted its efforts and resources towards social media projects. The American government has realized that the new paradigm means … Continue reading

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Week 14

Throughout this semester, we have been reading about whether or not the Internet is useful and revolutionary in the political scope. As unclear as the use of the Internet in past revolutions and electoral processes in creating mobilization of people, … Continue reading

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